labricoleuse: (history)
They're almost done. This group of projects had such cool little details that i've got more closeups than full-length shots!

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Closeup of faux embroidery on a coat by third-year grad Denise Chukhina.


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Close-up of machine-embroidered plastron on a gown by third-year grad Corinne Hodges.


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Rear view of pocket and vent on a jacket by second-year grad Erin Abbenante.



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Plastron and sleeve/cuff detail on a bodice by second-year grad Katie Keener.


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Mariner's cuff and pocket flap detail on a women's jacket by third-year grad Colleen Dobson.


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Broader detail view of the women's jacket by third-year grad Colleen Dobson.


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Left rear: pocket-hoops and gown by third-year grad Corinne Hodges.
Left foreground: fichu, bodice, skirt by second-year grad Katie Keener.
Right foreground: women's riding ensemble by third-year grad Colleen Dobson.

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Left: jacket, waistcoat, breeches by third-year grad Denise Chukhina.
Center: jacket, waistcoat, breeches by second-year grad Erin Abbenante.
Right: pocket-hoops and gown by third-year grad Corinne Hodges.
labricoleuse: (mee)

Moving ever closer to the end of the 18th century, period pattern class presented their post-cavalier yet pre-revolution era projects recently. There will only be one more of these this semester!



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Left: women's look by second year grad Katie Keener
Center left: women's look by third year grad Corinne Hodges
Center right: men's look by third year grad Denise Chukhina
Right: men's look by second year grad Erin Abbenante

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A better view of Erin's guy with research image.

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Riding habit by third year grad Colleen Dobson

labricoleuse: (history)
Period pattern class projects were presented this past Friday, and i've snapped some photos of them on display in the hall outside the costume shop:



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Left: Yellow satin gown by second-year grad Erin Abbenante
Center: Eggshell gown by third-year grad Colleen Dobson
Right: Navy gown with venice lace applique by third-year grad Denise Chukhina



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A better view of Denise Chukhina's project.
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Bodice by third-year grad Colleen Dobson. Check out the wave-blade slashes in the fabric!


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Detail shot of Denise's embellishment and the research image she worked from for the pattern.
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Left: Blue mens ensemble by third-year grad Corinne Hodges.
Right: Gold mens ensemble by second-year grad Katie Keener

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Detail shot of Katie's paned sleeve structure.
labricoleuse: (shakespearean alan cumming)
Costume Director Judy Adamson's period pattern class recently presented their half-drapes of the 1600s. Enjoy these shots i snapped of the forms displayed in the hallway outside our costume shop!



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Left side: Second year graduate Katie Keener
Right side: Third year graduate Corinne Hodges


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Left: Second year graduate Erin Abbenante
Center: Third year graduate Denise Chukina
Right: Third year graduate Colleen Dobson

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Detail shot of the sleeve on Corinne Hodges' gown

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Detail shot of the sleeve on Katie Keener's gown


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Detail shot of the sleeve on Erin Abbenante's gown

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Detail shot of the sleeve on Colleen Dobson's coat/doublet combo
labricoleuse: (shakespearean alan cumming)
First up, a warm welcome to all my new followers! It seems that my millinery trim giveaway is really popular! I thought it might be a fun idea for paying-it-forward in terms of streamlining things in the studio, and it appears i wasn't alone in that. Very exciting to have so many new readers, and for those who are here with a strictly-millinery interest, i'm sorry to start off with a post that has absolutely no hats in it. Hopefully the secret codpiece at the end will make up for the lack of sweet headwear.

And, because there are so many new followers, I think i should reiterate what the Period Pattern posts are before i dive into photos. I teach in the Costume Production MFA program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Our graduate students learn the many skills and arts of taking a costume design from rendering to reality for professional theatre/TV/film, and one of the ways in which that happens is through the series of period pattern classes, taught by our program head, Judy Adamson.

The class this semester is colloquially known as "Gothic to Revolution", and it focuses on the major silhouettes throughout those eras. The students trade off doing menswear and women's attire, and they select their own research images for the exact looks they want to reproduce (which are subject to approval by the professor, of course).

When I post photos of these projects, every so often the question comes up as to why the students often make the projects on the half. There are several reasons for the half-drape phenomenon.

First, they have only two weeks for each project, and in that time must create the pattern from scratch, using their knowledge of draping, drafting, and period research. Then they must make it in fabrics as close as they can find to the original, taking into consideration concerns for the stage, such as what sort of understructure might be required, and how an actress might negotiate getting in and out of the garment.

They work at full-scale, and the students must decide for themselves what an acceptable budget for the costume is. Because the garments are made on the half much of the time, students only have to buy half the fabric required, and that's a big deal for most graduate students living on a fixed income. And, sometimes this allows them to choose better quality fabrics to work with, because they don't have to buy as much as a full dress. With a half-drape, you do half the sewing and half the hand-finishing, and when you're making one every two weeks on top of your other coursework, teaching assistantship, and professional show assignments, saving the time/money can be a great boon.

Of course, they are always free to make their projects on the whole as full garments, and most of them elect to do so at least once or twice a semester. Sometimes this is because they have chosen an asymmetrical resource image/design, and sometimes it's because they want to do a particular piece as a complete garment for entry in a national competition or exhibition, or on commission.

So, that's the logic behind only requiring the half for these projects. You'll see in this collection though, one student with sideless gown elected to do it as a full costume, on commission for a friend who does reenactor activities.


IMG_2758
From left: loden green tunic and hose by third year graduate Colleen Dobson, brown robe/hose/hooded cowl by second year graduate Erin Abbenante, sideless gown and underdress by third year graduate Denise Chukhina, rust velveteen gown by third year graduate Corinne Hodges, fur-trimmed sideless surcoat by second year graduate Katie Keener

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Here's a detail shot that illustrates the sleeve construction on Corinne's dress
and the antique bullion trim at the front of Katie's surcoat.

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And, scandalous, i thought i ought to point out that Colleen went to the trouble to pattern and construct a functional codpiece for the hose on her guy!

Speaking of Colleen, some major kudos are in order! I'll just quote from the official announcement:

Please join us in congratulating third-year MFA candidate Colleen Dobson who has been selected as the winner of the 2015 Barbara Matera Award for Costume Making.  Colleen will be presented one of USITT’s prestigious Awards for Young Designers & Technicians in the Performing Arts at the Annual Conference & Stage Expo in Cincinnati, Ohio March 18-21, 2015.

The portfolios of the applicants were adjudicated by dedicated costume makers within the USITT membership. Colleen’s submitted portfolio of coursework and costumes made for PRC productions are undoubtedly deserving of this award.

Second year grad Katie Keener will also be traveling to USITT this year to participate in the Costume Commission Poster Session's juried exhibition. I'm so proud of Colleen, Katie, and all our students.
labricoleuse: (vintage hair)
I have slacked off bigtime on here, so first off, i apologize for the lack of content lately. I have all these posts backburnered, so hopefully i can catch up over the holiday break and post them all.

So, without further ado, here's the final two sets of period pattern projects which were presented in Judy Adamson's 20th Century Women's Wear class. (Judy is the head of the Costume Production MFA program here at UNC-Chapel Hill, and though i am not involved in this class, i always love sharing the projects.)

These projects are pretty cool to take a look at together in the same post. The first one involves the utility dresses of the 1940s--wartime fashion and textile rationing made for minimal fabric use in many styles of the period. The second set of projects is the New Look of the 1950s, when post-war fashion exploded into excess and skirts ballooned to use lots of fabric!

Read more... )
labricoleuse: (vintage hair)
Costume Director Judy Adamson's 20th Century Period Pattern class has recently presented their projects for 1930s bias-cut evening gowns. This is probably my favorite era, so i always love seeing these.




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Left: red charmeuse gown by second year grad Erin Abbenante
Right: Navy and orange Vionnet reproduction by third year grad Colleen Dobson


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Left: Navy and orange Vionnet reproduction by third year grad Colleen Dobson
Center: Navy rayon crepe gown by third year grad Corinne Hodges
Left: Mulberry and grey print gown by third year grad Denise Chukhina

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Foreground: Orange charmeuse and brown sequin gown by second year grad Katie Keener

Beautiful work, ladies!
labricoleuse: (vintage hair)
Judy Adamson's period pattern class presented 1920s day dresses last week (this semester is 20th century womenswear).

Here's some pix, plus a bonus footwear project!

Read more... )
labricoleuse: (vintage hair)
Judy Adamson's period pattern class is doing 20th Century Women's Wear by decade and they presented their first round of projects last week! Take a look:
Read more... )
labricoleuse: (history)
The semester has finally ended, and here are some images of the final round of projects from Costume Director Judy Adamson's period pattern class in 19th century women's attire.

Read more... )
labricoleuse: (vintage hair)
Another round of projects in Judy Adamson's 19th century period pattern class, this time the 1890s.

Read more... )
labricoleuse: (vintage hair)
Second round of bustle projects in Judy Adamson's period pattern class! I love these.

Read more... )
labricoleuse: (history)
These projects from Judy Adamson's 19th century women's draping class were presented a while ago, but we've been in the mad push on our repertory shows (which take place in and around a swimming pool), so i've admittedly slacked on keeping up with timely sharing of project pix.

Here you go!
Read more... )
labricoleuse: (history)
Costume Director Judy Adamson's period pattern class has recently presented mid-19th century dresses. Check them out!


Read more... )
labricoleuse: (history)
Costume Director Judy Adamson's period pattern class has presented their second round of projects in 19th century women's wear, and wow, are there some sleeves on these!


Read more... )
labricoleuse: (history)
School is back in session and Judy Adamson's period pattern class is already presenting their first round of projects for the semester. The topic this time is 19th century women, so the first set of projects looks like a Jane Austen festival!

This class in the past has had five or fewer students, but this time there's a group of six, so there's even more to share than usual.


Read more... )
labricoleuse: (vintage hair)
Period pattern class presented 1950s dresses this morning, and I completely covet them.Read more... )
labricoleuse: (milliner)
We've been so busy with Cabaret, i've slacked off on sharing some of the period pattern class projects. But i'll catch up! Today, 1930s evening looks and 1940s daywear looks.


Read more... )
labricoleuse: (history)
I've neglected sharing photos of Judy Adamson's period pattern class for the past couple of projects they've presented but i passed these in the hall display and snapped a couple of pictures. I love this period in fashion!

photo
Right to left: striped dress by second-year grad Candy McClernan,
diamond-pocketed dress by third-year grad Adrienne Corral
floral ditsy-print dress by second-year grad Kelly Renko
navy rayon crepe dress by second-year grad Leah Pelz


photo1
Detail shot of first two dresses pictured previously.
My detail shot of the other two didn't come out well.
labricoleuse: (vintage hair)
Costume Director Judy Adamson's period pattern class this semester focuses on 20th century women's wear, and their first project consisted of gowns and ensembles from the 1910s. Throughout the semester, they will progress forward by decades, sometimes creating both an evening and a daywear look per decade.

When I post photos of these projects, every so often the question comes up as to why the students often make the projects on the half. I usually explain it in the comments, but i figured i ought to write it out for a change in the actual post. There are several reasons for the half-drape phenomenon.

First, they have only two weeks for each project, and in that time must create the pattern from scratch, using their knowledge of draping, drafting, and period research. Then they must make it in fabrics as close as they can find to the original, taking into consideration concerns for the stage, such as what sort of understructure might be required, and how an actress might negotiate getting in and out of the garment.

They work at full-scale, and the students must decide for themselves what an acceptable budget for the costume is. Because the garments are made on the half much of the time, students only have to buy half the fabric required, and that's a big deal for most graduate students living on a fixed income. And, sometimes this allows them to choose better quality fabrics to work with, because they don't have to buy as much as a full dress. With a half-drape, you do half the sewing and half the hand-finishing, and when you're making one every two weeks on top of your other coursework, teaching assistantship, and professional show assignments, saving the time/money can be a great boon.

Of course, they are always free to make their projects on the whole as full garments, and most of them elect to do so at least once or twice a semester. Sometimes this is because they have chosen an asymmetrical resource image/design, and sometimes it's because they want to do a particular piece as a complete garment for entry in a national competition or exhibition. They definitely will do their bias-cut gowns of the 1930s on the whole, because a bias dress needs to exist as a complete thing in order for the grain to function properly.

So, that's the logic behind only requiring the half for these projects. You'll see in this collection though, one student with an asymmetrical Worth design as her resource image elected to do it as a full costume.

Read more... )

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